What is Enterprise Architecture BI Reporting?

For those who are not familiar with Enterprise Architecture, you may be wondering how does it value other than the obvious i.e. ‘Modelling the Enterprise’. The short presentation below explains the concept of EA BI Reporting in a very simple and easy to understand way.

The presenter, Helmut Schindlwick states that:

Many organisations building models in order to understand their enterprise. Different stakeholders, teams working together in central repositories to be prepared for solving future problems. This presentation is focusing on Business Intelligence (BI) for Enterprise Architecture models/projects. Most important are the impact analysis reports, what happens if an application will be retired, or who is affected if an IT centre is no longer working are just a few possible questions to answer for an EA team.
Most experienced EA teams who are implementing strategic and tactical Enterprise Architecture initiatives use a variety of tools. In my experience the ability to take the concepts explained in this presentation to ‘next level’ and ensure that reporting can be readily accessible by all is to use a robust EA platform.
I would be interested to hear how well EA BI reporting is being adopted by not just EA teams but also wider organisational stakeholder.

Performance Metrics and KPIs – A Back Catalogue

I have been doing some work recently defining a performance measurement framework and during my cyber travels came across a site that catalogues a wide range of KPIs. Thought it may be useful for others who are looking for some specific descriptions of KPIs.

KPI and Performance Management

The KPI Library describes themselves as follows:

The free Key Performance Indicator (KPI) Library is a community of business professionals that provides a catalogue of KPIs for identifying & prioritizing the KPIs that really matter for your organization’s success. Login or register for access.

A link can also be found on my Resource page. I would be interested to hear how useful it is.

Enjoy!

Making the Complex Simple – How best to streamline and automate business processes

I work with various organisations and in my experience, they are typically in various states of maturity in terms of their understanding and adoption of BPM. The one thing I do tend to find  is that they all seem to share common problems.

In this post I have listed some of the ones that I come across and also explain an approach that can be adopted to help move them from a reactive business to one that is more proactive and dynamic in making better decisions.

Organisations are inherently composite and complex ecosystems in which business processes are pervasive. This complexity generally manifests itself in various ways and can include the following:

  • Management and employees have difficulty in making correct decisions due to not having accurate and timely information.
  • Information is of devoid of business context (not seen in as part of a business process) and therefore may lead inconsistent decisions.
  • Planning is often difficult due to ‘broken’ processes, poor working practices and inconsistent information.
  • IT systems that support the various business processes act as inhibiters rather than enablers as they are typically designed deployed and managed as information islands or stove pipes.
  • Enforcing business rules, policies and procedures is an arduous task due to poor process visibility, accurate real time information and no integrated or consistent auditing.

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How BPM can help drive down IT Operational costs

Foreword: Recently I was doing some research into IT operational cost management and specifically how discretionary spend can be increased for use in new and innovative projects across an organisation. I came across some interesting data and have summarised some of my thoughts from a white paper I was writing on how a BPMS can support this type of initiative.

Organisations are continually under pressure to do ‘more with less’ and this is especially true in organisations where IT departments are seen by the business as being unresponsive and a cost centre, rather than ensuring innovation. This may be further exacerbated by external pressures such as competitors encroaching on existing markets and global economic challenges.

Research has shown that CIOs continually have to ensure that business demands are aligned with available IT resources and budget constraints. It is generally accepted that at least 80% of IT resources and budgets are spent on ongoing maintenance. This creates a dilemma for CIOs and IT departments who have to find ways of reducing operational costs, and designing and delivering solutions more effectively.

“78% of large enterprise budgets are swallowed in existing maintenance–keeping the lights on”
“40% of enterprise scale companies are seeing IT budgets reducing in real terms”
Source: The Bathwick Group, Driving business value from IT, Dec 2007

 

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