What is Enterprise Architecture BI Reporting?

For those who are not familiar with Enterprise Architecture, you may be wondering how does it value other than the obvious i.e. ‘Modelling the Enterprise’. The short presentation below explains the concept of EA BI Reporting in a very simple and easy to understand way.

The presenter, Helmut Schindlwick states that:

Many organisations building models in order to understand their enterprise. Different stakeholders, teams working together in central repositories to be prepared for solving future problems. This presentation is focusing on Business Intelligence (BI) for Enterprise Architecture models/projects. Most important are the impact analysis reports, what happens if an application will be retired, or who is affected if an IT centre is no longer working are just a few possible questions to answer for an EA team.
Most experienced EA teams who are implementing strategic and tactical Enterprise Architecture initiatives use a variety of tools. In my experience the ability to take the concepts explained in this presentation to ‘next level’ and ensure that reporting can be readily accessible by all is to use a robust EA platform.
I would be interested to hear how well EA BI reporting is being adopted by not just EA teams but also wider organisational stakeholder.
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IBM BlueWorks – Value Proposition & Overview

Since the news broke earlier in the year, there has been much discussion regarding what IBM BlueWorks is and what its value proposition is comparison to WebSphere. As can be expected, there has also been some confusion.

In the light of the Lombadi Software acquisition, I thought this brief overview would be useful for the uninitiated. More information can be found at the IBM Blueworks Community site and for an overview of Lombardi refer to this post.

New BPM & EA Reading List!

As part of the resources added to this site, I have started a reading list for various organisational and technology transformation topics.

Check it out here.

BPM Modeling Strategies Explained

I have made a couple of posts on approaches to process modeling and how benefits can be derived from using itterative methods over the last few months. Here is another one that I find very interesting as it explores the eternal question of  ‘BPM Model Preservation vs Model Transformation’.

The recent presentation (with embeded audio) given by Keith Swenson at the  2009 Process.gov conference in Washinton DC on June 19, explains how a process model may or may not change over its lifetime i.e. static business model to execution in a BPMS and what the various considerations and trade offs are.

Keith identifies 3 kinds of change that a process may undergo:

  • Business Process Enactment: – the business process as it moves from the beginning to the end of handling a single case. The process definition does not normally change here, only the process instance or context that records the state of a particular case changes.
  • Business Process Lifecycle: – these are the changes that a business process goes through from initial concept, to modeling, to integration, and finally to deployment into an enactment environment.
  • Business Process Improvement: – the change to a business process that occurs over time through repeated use of the business process lifecycle followed by analysis of how well that version of the business process worked.

How to ‘SCRUM’ – Approaches to Itterative BPM Agility

I have worked with various organisations to implement BPM solutions at both Enterprise and Departmental levels. A common challenge that I often come across is that both Business and IT don’t always understand how to apply itterative development approaches to support a BPM implementation.

As practitioners, I find we tend to take these types of approaches for granted but customers often need some education, especially if they have not used anything but Waterfall. The most common issue I find with Waterfall is that it instills a mind set of “Big Bang” project/solution delivery i.e. ‘know it all the build it and finally test it all’.  

With greater pressure on both Buisness and IT to show value and returns quicker and more consistently, itterative approaches have demonstrated their value with much better ROI and a lower unsuccessful implementation risk ratio, especially if an organisation is new to BPM. 

Various itterative approaches exist and the more commonly known one in my experience is SCRUM, XP, Agile and RUP. To help educate novices what its all about I thought the following resources may be useful.

Ken Schwaber co-developed the Agile process, Scrum. He is a founder of the Agile Alliance and Scrum Alliance, and signatory to the Agile Manifesto. Ken has been a software developer for over thirty years. He is an active advocate and evangelist for Agile processes.

 Further Reading (oldies but goodies):

A 15 min BPM Workout – Lombardi

Lombardi_logoAs someone who works with customers to deliver business value through BPM, I have definitely noticed an increased interest from organisations exploiting existing BPM investments as well as those that are new to BPM trying to determine its potential.

Lombardi Software recently released this 15 min (more like 30 but who’s counting) introduction to BPM. Thought it may be informative for those of you trying to understand the value of BPM.

Quoting Lombardi marketing:

…let us help you share the BPM vision with your co-workers. ‘How To Explain BPM To Your Co-workers In 15 Minutes or Less’ is an informative webinar to help you discover what to present and how to answer the most frequently asked questions.

To view, click here.

Information Worker – Application Design Guidance

User Experience Design is a concept that is fundamental to how we experience information and services in an electonic age.

window-to-the-world

User experience is a term used to describe the overall experience and satisfaction a user has when using a product or system. It most commonly refers to a combination of software and business topics, such as selling over the web, but it applies to any result of interaction design – Wikipedia

I will not attempt to explain all the facets of this concept but further information can be found at:

What I did want to share was a very informative resource I found that focuses on helping product teams who are creating new or iteratively improving applications for thinking work.

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